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Archive for October, 2015

For me the Kitchner stitch has always been a challenge so as a reference for myself and maybe help someone else I’ve put together a little tutorial.  I have tried all sorts of ways to setup the live stitches so I could see them better. I have settled on putting the stitches on needles so I could  rid of the waste yarn, one less thing to get in my way when stitching.  After watching many videos and looking at lots of blog sites with instructions, it seems that everyone has their own little twist to the process. But not one could answer my question of “How are the stitches loaded onto the needles so the stitches don’t twist?” So here is my interpretation of the KITCHNER Stitch.

Stitch set-up on needles:

Pick up the leg of the stitch that has an X.

Kitchner Stitch Loading

Kitchner on Needles 2

Terms that I use:

Stitch side terms

Getting Started:

  1. With yarn that is to be used for the sewing, bring up through the first stitch on the lower needle as if to purl. (Purl on)
  2. Then put the yarn through the first stitch on the upper needle as if to knit. (Knit on)

Main sewing:

Lower Needle

1st stitch (Knit Off)

Knit Off lower

2nd stitch  (Purl On)

Kitchner Lower  Purl on

Upper Needle

1st stitch (Purl Off)

Purl Off

2nd stitch (Knit On)

Kitchner Upper  Knit on

Continue this way until last stitch on each needle. Then I usually do the first half of the stitch.  Knit Off and purl into the next  stitch, this stitch has already been knitted. Upper needle purl off and knit into the next stitch, again this stitch has already been knitted. Then push the needle through to the inside if it is a sock or through to the back of the work if it is a scarf or something flat. Weave off the end and trim the working yarn.

Finished seam:

Finished seam

The yarn for this pair of socks was spun from Jacob wool and knit on the LeGare 400 sock knitting machine.

 

 

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